Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Troubleshoot Wireless Router Problems


wireless-router

Reboot the Router

Have you tried rebooting it? Yes, once again,is the solution to many network problems. Whether websites are failing to load, everything network-related seems slow, connections are dropping, or your wireless is flaking out, you may just want to try rebooting your router.
This shouldn’t be necessary, but many routers seem to need an occasional reboot to keep working well. The reboot process is simple on most routers — unplug your router’s power cable, wait a few seconds, and then plug it back in. If you have separate modem, you may also want to try unplugging your modem’s power cable and plugging it back in after a few seconds. Some devices may have a power switch, but the unplug-and-plug-back-in method applies to all routers.
If you have to frequently reboot your router, the manufacturer’s firmware may just be unstable and buggy. Installing an alternative firmware like DD-WRT might help.
reset-router-to-fix-problems

Check for Overheating

Like any other electronic device, routers can fall prey to overheating. This overheating can damage the router over time or just make it unstable. Check your router’s temperature to see how hot it is. If it seems very hot, ensure that it’s getting enough airflow. If the vents are blocked or you have the router in a hot location — like on top of a tower PC that heats up — overheating could be causing instability. It’s also possible that past overheating may have damaged the router.

Verify Cables Are Securely Connected

This may sound like a no-brainer, but we sometimes forget to check the most obvious solution before moving on to more complicated ones. Someone may have accidentally pulled on or kicked a cable, causing it to unplug or become loose. You should check all of the cables involved and ensure that they’re securely connected.
Be sure to check the power cables to your router and modem, the cable between your router and modem, the cable between the modem and the wall socket, and each Ethernet cable plugged into the back of the router. Check each end of the cable and ensure it’s securely connected — it could look connected but be a bit loose.
reset-router-cables

Change the Wireless Channel

If you’re in a location with a lot of wireless routers nearby, like an apartment building, there’s a good chance your router is subject to interference from other wireless routers sending signals on the same wireless frequency. Determining the optimal wireless channel for your area and changing your router to operate on that wireless channel instead of a more congested one can reduce this interference, improving your wireless signal.